Home Emotional music Music Therapy, Doctor Phone Call May Relieve Anxiety In IVF Patients

Music Therapy, Doctor Phone Call May Relieve Anxiety In IVF Patients

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21 October 2021

3 minutes to read

Source / Disclosures

Source:

Shah JS, et al. O-167. Presented at: American Society of Reproductive Medicine Scientific Congress & Expo; October 17-20, 2021; Baltimore (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures:
Shah does not report any relevant financial disclosure. Healio could not confirm relevant financial information from Vaithianathan at the time of publication.

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As doctors try to alleviate anxiety in patients undergoing IVF, new research suggests that music therapy and personalized phone calls can alleviate some distress.

The results were presented at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Scientific Congress & Expo.

“Infertility is a stressful condition that disrupts the psychological and emotional well-being of couples”, Hema Vaithianathan, MD, MRCOG, a consultant from SIMS hospital in India, said during a pre-recorded presentation.

Music therapy

Vaithianathan and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of music therapy in reducing anxiety and stress in 144 infertile women who have undergone IVF procedures. Women were assigned in a 1: 1 ratio to receive music therapy plus standard care or standard care alone. The patients were between 21 and 38 years old.

Participants in the intervention group listened to music for 15 minutes, 1 hour before IVF treatment. Vaithianathan and colleagues used the Beck Anxiety Inventory Scale to collect data on the effectiveness of the music therapy intervention. Patients were to complete the anxiety test 15 minutes before their IVF procedure.

The average anxiety scores of women assigned to receive music therapy before IVF decreased from 13.5 to 8.6, which was statistically significant, the researchers said. Meanwhile, the women in the control group experienced no significant improvement in anxiety, with a baseline score of 14.73 and a follow-up score of 13.22. There was no significant improvement in anxiety after IVF in the two groups (6.73 vs. 4.23). Overall, anxiety was low in 73.6% of women, moderate in 18.8% of women, and severe in 7.6% of women, according to Vaithianathan and colleagues.
“Infertility is described as a complex, physically and emotionally painful situational crisis for couples due to the perceived complexity and imprecise outcome of pregnancy,” said Vaithianathan. “Interventions like music therapy can be easily used as a complementary means of reducing anxiety levels in women, especially during the procedural aspect of IVF treatment.”

Phone call during the waiting period

In a separate randomized controlled trial, Jaimin S. Shah, MD, a researcher in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Boston IVF, and her colleagues investigated whether a phone call from an “empathetic” doctor benefited women who waited for their pregnancy test results after a pregnancy test. embryo transfer.

“In previous studies, research had shown that a third to half of insured patients discontinue care before pregnancy or the end of IVF cycles, the most common reason being the emotional burden of care,” Shah said. during a presentation.

The researchers recruited women aged 18 to 43 who underwent their first embryo transfer with fresh autologous or euploid cryopreserved and thawed embryos after a preimplantation genetic test-aneuploidy. Patients first completed an online survey about their demographics, anxiety, and depression.

After the embryo transfer, 116 women were randomly assigned to receive a 5-minute scripted phone call from Shah, who had previously received empathy training, 3-4 days after the procedure. Their anxiety and depression scores were compared to a group of 115 women who received routine care after embryo transfer. All patients completed a follow-up survey 8-9 days after their intervention but before a pregnancy test.

Baseline characteristics were similar between the phone call and routine care groups. About 40% of patients reported a previous diagnosis of anxiety and 23-24% reported a previous diagnosis of depression.

Women in the phone call group experienced smaller mean increases in anxiety and depression compared to women in the routine care group (P = .002), according to the researchers. Specifically, the routine care group had an average increase of 7.8 points in the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory total score compared to 3.3 in the phone call group. The routine care group had an average increase of 2.4 points on the anxiety and depression scale in the hospital versus 0.3 in the phone call group.

According to Shah and colleagues, about 55% of patients in the phone call group said the doctor’s call was very helpful, and 81% said it reduced their anxiety and distress a little or a lot. . In addition, 83.5% of patients in the routine care group said that a doctor call would be helpful during the waiting period, and 86.1% said that a call would reduce their anxiety and pain. distress.

“Infertile patients have high levels of anxiety,” Shah said. “A call from a doctor, even for 5 minutes, can reduce anxiety levels during the waiting period. Patients want more points of contact in treatment cycles.

The references:

Shah JS, et al. O-167. Presented at: American Society of Reproductive Medicine Scientific Congress & Expo; October 17-20, 2021; Baltimore (hybrid meeting).

Vaithianathan H, et al. P-610. Presented at: American Society of Reproductive Medicine Scientific Congress & Expo; October 17-20, 2021; Baltimore (hybrid meeting).


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